What Three Vegan Pole Dancers Eat in a Day

What Three Vegan Pole Dancers Eat in a Day

When a person toys around with the idea of eating vegan, a few questions tend to fill their minds, a main one being “Will I get enough protein?”

The concern can be especially high for people who are regularly active.

We’ve been conditioned to think that meat is the best source of protein, but studies have shown that too much meat consumption is actually bad for your health, even leading to shortened lifespans. It’s easier than it may seem to substitute plant-based alternatives that still provide the daily nutrition we need. It’s just about knowing where to start.

For some ideas, I asked three professional vegan pole dancers about what they eat on training days to keep their minds and bodies running at optimum speed. Check out their comments below.

Photo courtesy of Monica Kay

Monica Kay (@vegan.pole.dancer)

Pole Positive: How long have you been vegan?

Monica Kay: I have been vegan for 13 years and I’ve been certified in plant-based nutrition since 2011.

PP: What meals do you typically opt for on a pole training day?

MK: On training days, I will usually have fresh fruit juice for breakfast (24oz or more). I like to train with a nearly empty stomach, so I also keep my lunch light. Trail mix or a piece of toast or fruit keeps me going.

For dinner, to help heal my muscles, I will eat a hefty meal that includes protein. Examples would be pasta with beans, rice with lentils, veggie soup, or a big salad with peanut dressing and tofu. Other things I enjoy are bread with Miyoko’s Kitchen artisan nut cheese and sometimes a pre- or post-dinner smoothie. I have an intense sweet tooth, so cookies, cakes, and/or ice cream usually end up in my belly before bed!

*Check out this spicy red pasta with lentils recipe and stay tuned for an original pasta/beans recipe this week!

PP: Why do you tend to choose those meals?

MK: Protein takes time and energy for the body to digest. Eating protein before and during workouts fatigues my body and makes me feel heavy and sluggish, so I always save protein for after my workouts. Carbohydrates (like from fruit) give me the energy I need to climb the pole and dance.

Simply put: I eat or drink carbs before and during training. I eat protein after training.

PP: How has being vegan affected your pole training?:

MK: I started poling eight years ago, after already being vegan for a few years, therefore I can’t compare pre-vegan poling to vegan poling. However, I sincerely believe the only reason I am able to pole at my age is due to my diet (I am 43 years old). Plant-based nutrients are full of antioxidants which assist in keeping our cells young. Drinking lots of water and eating vegetables and fruit supply my joints with much-needed hydration, which helps with maintaining flexibility.

***

Photo courtesy of Ashley Fox

Ashley Fox (@foxyashleyfox)

Pole Positive: How long have you been vegan?

Ashley Fox: I have been Vegan since 2012—about six years.

PP: What meals do you typically opt for on a pole training day?

AF: When training I love to eat a variety of meals with avocado, spinach, kale, lentils, nuts, mushrooms, bananas and hemp seeds. Some of my favorite snacks and meals are peanut butter, hemp, spinach sandwiches, kale, avocado, quinoa bowls or lentil, mushroom stew.

*Here’s a simple recipe for one-pot mushroom stew

PP: Why do you tend to choose those meals?

Those meals help my muscles recover quickly and provide me with a lot of energy.

PP: How has being vegan affected your pole training?

AF: Being vegan has dramatically improved my training. I need less rest days and I do not get injured as frequently as before. My muscles also recover much quicker.

***

Photo courtesy of Jena Clough

Jena Clough (@jena_clough_dreamfyrepolefit)

Pole Positive: How long have you been vegan?

JC: I have been vegan for around nine months.

PP: What meals do you typically opt for on a pole training day?

JC: I love bagels—they’re my weakness—so I get bagels with seeds and use tofutti cream cheese with tomatoes, arugula, spinach, hemp seeds, avocado and scallions, and basically make a vegan breakfast sandwich.
I love chickpeas lately with flax oil, Himalayan sea salt and pepper over spinach and arugula. My husband makes great stir fries for dinner: tempeh with noodles, bok choy, carrots, broccoli, onions, etc. Also soups are easy and great nutrition.

PP: Why do you tend to choose those meals?

JC: I look at it like this: If I am going to train hard, I need to have the right nutrition and variety. I need carbs and energy and protein for after my workout. I feel full with these meals and that makes me feel strong.

PP: How has being vegan affected your pole training?:

JC: It takes more planning and care when eating but it’s so worth it. I feel stronger and less bloated when working out. I also feel very clear-headed when training now and more focused and aware of my body. 

***

I became vegan more than one year ago after cutting out poultry and red meat about four years ago, then becoming vegetarian shortly after. It all begins with baby steps, so consider starting small by swapping out one of your regular meat-based meals with an idea above and see if you notice a difference in your training and overall feeling. Let me know your results in the comments!

(Feel free to also follow my Pinterest page for some more vegan recipes, information and inspiration!)


*This post may contain affiliate links. View my full disclosure policy here.